Just a Touch of Arsenic

Most anyone who’s been in or around the charismatic wing of Christianity has likely heard the phrase “chew the meat, spit out the bones” in reference to questionable teaching.  Keep the good part of the teaching, throw out the bad. However, someone could chew on a bone by mistake and break a tooth.  Worse yet, someone could accidentally swallow a small bone and choke.  Wouldn’t it be best to remove the meat from the bone before putting it into your mouth?

Some will make excuses for the teachers assuming they just didn’t phrase that particular part correctly, the message was misunderstood, or the teacher is still growing and just doesn’t know better yet.  So, hey why not cut some slack?  “Where’s the grace?” they’ll say.  However, the prophet Hosea [4:6] stated:

“My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge…” [NKJV]

Destroyed.  Not just a slap on the wrist, an “aw shucks, it’s OK,” but DESTROYED. This verse, like the entire book of Hosea, is written to the nation Israel as a warning against her spiritual adultery – idolatry – in not adhering to the whole Truth, not acknowledging God as Lord of all.  However, the basic message has an application for the NT Christian: we are all individually responsible for our own spiritual growth (see Hebrews 5:11-14).

Teaching is serious business as the Apostle James states:

 “Not many should presume to be teachers, my brothers, because you know that we who teach will be judged more strictly.”  [James 3:1 NIV]

Jesus warned against the “leaven” of the Pharisees and the Sadducees.  It just takes a little bit to leaven the whole dough.  And, once the teaching is leavened this leaven cannot be removed without the rest remaining untainted.  IT’S ALL LEAVENED.

If a person is suggesting that we disregard the “bones” of a teaching then this person is saying the rest of the teaching is OK.  This person is also, in that sense, a teacher themselves.  That’s a rather dangerous position to take in view of the James verse above and other Scripture.

So, for those who like the phrase “chew the meat, spit out the bones” I have a question for you to ponder: How much arsenic would be OK in your dinner?  A teaspoon?  A drop?